May 2012
Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.

Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.

  • Licensed Professional Counselor
  • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
  • Board Certified Professional Counselor
  • Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama,
    Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
  • Voice Dialogue Facilitator
  • Relapse Prevention Therapist
  • Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
  • Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
  • Certified Life Coach
  • Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
  • Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
  • Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
  • Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
  • Certified Associate of Logotherapy
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy
  • Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


A Note From Mark Felber

It is impossible to have a healthy relationship with someone who has no boundaries, with someone who cannot communicate directly, and honestly. Learning how to set boundaries is a necessary step in learning to be a friend to ourselves. It is our responsibility to take care of ourselves -- to protect ourselves when it is necessary.

It is impossible to learn to be loving to ourselves without owning our self -- and owning our rights and responsibilities as co-creators of our lives.

-- Robert Burney

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Announcements

Singles Mingle

The "Singles-Mingle" program is temporarily suspended. Please check back for news about the new location and schedule for this monthly program with rotating topics on Relationships and Mental Health facilitated by Mark Felber.

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Eleven seminarsSurviving Improper Parenting

Because parents are usually the first influence in our lives, what we learn or do not learn from them when we're young can have lasting repercussions. Unfortunately, this can translate into many people suffering from the effects of improper parenting.

If not addressed, those effects can be felt for a lifetime, and they include low self-esteem, being drawn into abusive relationships, unhealthy habits or inhibitions and feelings of worthlessness.

Improper parenting can include physical, sexual and verbal abuse, physical and emotional neglect, rejection, favoritism of one sibling over another, lack of discipline, forcing choices on children and being overly protective or indulgent.

Because we often parent as we were parented, it's important to heal our own wounds and learn proper parenting techniques so that we don't perpetuate the cycle. As P.D. James wrote in Time to Be in Earnest, "What a child doesn't receive, he can seldom later give."

Click here for more.

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Setting Limits:
How to Say Yes to Yourself and No to Others

Read any magazine article or book about parenting and the author will advise the necessity of setting limits for children. "Set limits and stick to them," parents are counseled. Limits create the structure and discipline that every child needs for healthy upbringing.

But for adults -- especially those who tend to view other people's needs and wants as more important than their own -- setting limits is more than an exercise in discipline; it's a vital component in good self-care.

Consider Georgia. Her calendar is filled with one family event after another. A niece's graduation followed by a great-uncle's 75th birthday party followed by a tea her mother planned for an old family friend. Much as she loves her family, enough is enough. After a day at work and meeting her immediate family's needs, she has hardly any time left for herself.

Or Burke whose boss scarcely gives him time to complete one project before he lays on another. Then another. Work is so backlogged Burke stays at the office every night till past nine and goes in on weekends as well.

Stephanie's husband helped her build a studio for her photography in the garage then stored his fishing gear willy-nilly in whatever cabinet or cupboard he wanted.

By not setting limits, Georgia, Burke and Stephanie are letting the needs and wants of others to come before their own well-being.

Click here for more.

 

 

Copyright 2012 Claire Communications.
This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323