September 2012
Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.

Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.

  • Licensed Professional Counselor
  • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
  • Board Certified Professional Counselor
  • Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama,
    Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
  • Voice Dialogue Facilitator
  • Relapse Prevention Therapist
  • Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
  • Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
  • Certified Life Coach
  • Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
  • Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
  • Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
  • Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
  • Certified Associate of Logotherapy
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy
  • Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


A Note From Mark Felber

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won't have as much censorship because we won't have as much fear.

-- Judy Blume

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Eleven seminarsSay the Hard Thing:
How to Have that Difficult Conversation

"There are no classes in life for beginners," wrote poet Rainer Maria Rilke. "Right away you are always asked to deal with what is most difficult."

Saying the hard thing can be one of the most difficult things we ever do. And for many of us, just thinking about doing it can cause worry, fear and stress. The good news is that getting these conversations right has more to do with planning and practice than saying "just the right thing." And when we dare to broach these hard topics with other people, there are often hidden rewards.

The Benefits of Speaking Up

Difficult conversations have the power to get you what you really want from life. They can clear the air between you and someone else. And they can give your self-esteem a real boost.

Revealing how you really feel and what you really want is a life-long practice that sets you up for more good things to come. Regardless of what happens or how the other person responds, making your true self visible will only make you stronger, healthier and more at peace with yourself.

Click here for more.

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Taking Feedback (to Heart)

A colleague who just heard your presentation at work is giving you some feedback that you were too quiet, didn't get to the point quickly enough and lacked a compelling example.

Your breathing goes shallow and your body stiffens, your heart speeds up, and you look around to see if anyone is in earshot of this conversation. You worked for days trying to perfect this presentation -- days!

Faced with the often-difficult experience of feedback -- in our work and personal lives -- many of us respond in unproductive ways. But taking in feedback from others, both positive and negative, is imperative if we are to experience the satisfaction that comes with enhanced competence and improved relations.

It is possible -- and necessary -- to think positively about feedback.

Typical Reactions to Feedback

When given difficult feedback, most of us find that we do one or more of the following:

Pretend. We say little, disguise any hurt or humiliation, push the feelings way down and eventually act like it never happened. Thank you so much for sharing that.

Defend. We justify our actions, give explanations, point out reasons. There was so much happening last week, I didn't end up with nearly the time I needed to prepare. Oh, and the microphone wasn't working so well today.

Deny. Denial automatically makes the other person wrong. I didn't see a problem; I'm great at what I do.

Click here for more.

 

 

Copyright 2012 Claire Communications.
This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323