October 2012
Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.

Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.

  • Licensed Professional Counselor
  • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
  • Board Certified Professional Counselor
  • Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama,
    Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
  • Voice Dialogue Facilitator
  • Relapse Prevention Therapist
  • Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
  • Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
  • Certified Life Coach
  • Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
  • Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
  • Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
  • Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
  • Certified Associate of Logotherapy
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy
  • Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


A Note From Mark Felber

Everyone suffers at least one bad betrayal in their lifetime. It's what unites us. The trick is not to let it destroy your trust in others when that happens. Don't let them take that from you.

-- Sherrilyn Kenyon, Invincible

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Learning to Trust After Betrayal

A man finds out his business partner has been using the company's profits to fund a gambling addiction.

A woman learns that her sister has hidden assets from their parents' estate.

A husband discovers his wife has been having an affair with his friend.

Whether it's by a sibling, colleague, spouse or other close individual, betrayal slices through us like nothing else. It shatters close bonds, destroys self-esteem and breeds insecurity. It's almost guaranteed to cause pain, heartache, shock and fury.

But it is possible to mend the wounds of betrayal. It's possible to conquer rage and regain dignity. Most of all, it's possible to trust again.

Click here for more.

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How Well Do You Cope with Disappointment?

Disappointment is that feeling of being let down by a person, an expectation or a hope. It is a normal response that everyone experiences. But all too often, when we're disappointed and especially need caring attention, we beat ourselves up instead. Take this quiz to see how well you take care of yourself after a disappointment.

True or false?

  1. I recognize that disappointment is a part of life. When I experience a disappointment, it doesn't mean I'm a bad person or that I deserved it.

  2. When I have suffered a disappointment, I let myself have my feelings. I realize that when you give feelings the time and attention they need and deserve, they tend to fade on their own.

  3. With a therapist or in another safe setting, I work through other feelings that disappointment brings to the surface. These feelings often include shock, hurt and anger.

  4. While the feelings of disappointment are fresh, I avoid any conclusions about my behavior or role in the situation. Self-analysis has its place, but in the early stage it's more likely to be destructive self-recrimination.

Click here for more.

 

 

Copyright 2012 Claire Communications.
This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323