Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.

Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.

  • Licensed Professional Counselor
  • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
  • Board Certified Professional Counselor
  • Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama,
    Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
  • Voice Dialogue Facilitator
  • Relapse Prevention Therapist
  • Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
  • Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
  • Certified Life Coach
  • Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
  • Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
  • Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
  • Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
  • Certified Associate of Logotherapy
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy
  • Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


February 2013

ANotefromRichCampe

You can talk to someone for years, everyday, and still, it won't mean as much as what you can have when you sit in front of someone, not saying a word, yet you feel that person with your heart, you feel like you've known that person forever....connections are made with the heart, not the tongue.

-- C. JoyBell C.

ANotefromRichCampe

Are You a Good Listener?

Eleven seminarsGood communication is a two way street: speaking and listening. Listening doesn't mean just not speaking. To be an effective listener requires certain behaviors and attitudes. Listening is an action word. Find out how good a listener you are by answering True or False to the following:

  1. Listening means paying attention. When I listen to someone, I focus my attention on the speaker. I look directly at him or her, and concentrate on hearing what he or she is saying.

  2. Listening means accepting what the other person says. When I listen to someone, I withhold judgment and accept what he or she is saying "as is." I acknowledge what the person is saying without labeling it right or wrong, good or bad, true or false.

  3. Listening means being interested in what the other person says. When I listen to someone, I invite the speaker to give his or her opinion, say what's on his or her mind, or say how he or she feels about the topic or issue.

  4. Listening means confirming and clarifying what I believe I heard. When I listen to someone, I ask specific questions such as "What I heard you say is ... is that right?" or "I think I understand what you said, but will you elaborate on ...?" or "When you say ..., do you mean...?

Click here for more.

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How Well Do You Practice Empathy?

Empathy -- that quality of recognizing and understanding another person's desires, beliefs and emotions -- is one of the most important skills we can ever acquire. It fosters meaningful relationships, reduces prejudice and negative assumptions, encourages honest communication and can help avert violence.

Studies have found that people high in empathy are more confident, sensitive and assertive, and they enjoy better physical and mental health. Often described as standing in another person's shoes or looking through the other's eyes, empathy connects us human-to-human.

Take this quiz to see how well you practice empathy.

True or false?

Set 1

  1. If I don't know enough to understand, and empathize with, another's dilemma, I try to increase my knowledge by asking questions.

  2. I recognize and remember that others are different from me and might see and feel things differently from how I might experience the same situation. I try to look at the situation through that person's eyes, not my own.

  3. I don't need to be right about what I imagine the other person to be feeling. If I've misunderstood, I ask the person to help me correct my impressions. Doing so helps me learn more about the other.

  4. When I show that I understand the other person's experience, I notice that the person I'm talking with opens up more.

Click here for more.

 

 

Copyright 2013 Claire Communications.
This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323