Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.

Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.

  • Licensed Professional Counselor
  • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
  • Board Certified Professional Counselor
  • Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama,
    Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
  • Voice Dialogue Facilitator
  • Relapse Prevention Therapist
  • Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
  • Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
  • Certified Life Coach
  • Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
  • Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
  • Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
  • Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
  • Certified Associate of Logotherapy
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy
  • Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com


April 2013

ANotefromRichCampe

Personal Quote: In a controversy the instant we feel anger we have already
ceased striving for the truth.

-- Buddha

ANotefromRichCampe

Confidence and Self-Respect Through Conflict

Eleven seminarsQuestion: Would you rather go to the dentist for a root canal or go to a friend and confront her with something that bothers you?

If you picked a root canal, you're not alone. Most people will do anything to avoid conflict and all the accompanying feelings of anger and frustration. On the list of things people love to do, confrontation probably ranks lower than standing in line at the DMV or, yes, even oral surgery.

But conflict doesn't have to be like that. Not only is conflict a normal part of life, it can be managed and even made into a positive jumping-off point for becoming a stronger and calmer person. Confronting someone -- be it a business partner or a family member -- and feeling that both of you "won" can be as exhilarating as jumping out of a plane. And in the case of conflict, your life-saving parachute is a set of tools that help you survive any encounter or conflict situation.

"In many ways, conflict can be productive," writes Sam Deep, co-author of What to Ask When You Don't Know What to Say. "Like a grain of sand in an oyster, it can produce ‘pearls' by encouraging creative thinking, risk-taking and entrepreneurial spirit."

Click here for more.

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How Well Do You Express Anger?

Not only does pent-up anger not feel good, but it's bad for our health, potentially leading to depression, high blood pressure and other stress-related conditions. Learning healthy ways to express anger can help us feel better physically and emotionally and bring more authenticity and intimacy into our lives.

Answer the following true/false questions to discover how well you express anger.

Set 1

  1. I build up resentments over time, and then let them all out in one big blowup.

  2. I sometimes cut people out of my life when they make me angry.

  3. It's unsafe to express anger. I internalize it and then end up feeling depressed.

  4. If I told someone I was angry at him or her, I'd make myself too vulnerable. The other person would then be angry at me and might end the relationship, or, somehow, I'd pay for it.

Click here for more.

 

 

Copyright 2013 Claire Communications.
This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323