Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.
Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com

Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.
Licensed Professional Counselor
Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
Board Certified Professional Counselor
Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama, Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
Voice Dialogue Facilitator
Relapse Prevention Therapist
Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
Certified Life Coach
Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
Certified Associate of Logotherapy
Dialectical Behavior Therapy
Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com
July 2013
"There are places in your heart you don't even know exist until you love a child."

- Ann Lamont
Featured Article

Surviving Improper Parenting

Eleven seminars Because parents are usually the first influence in our lives, what we learn or do not learn from them when we're young can have lasting repercussions. Unfortunately, this can translate into many people suffering from the effects of improper parenting.

If not addressed, those effects can be felt for a lifetime, and they include low self-esteem, being drawn into abusive relationships, unhealthy habits or inhibitions and feelings of worthlessness.

Improper parenting can include physical, sexual and verbal abuse, physical and emotional neglect, rejection, favoritism of one sibling over another, lack of discipline, forcing choices on children and being overly protective or indulgent.

Because we often parent as we were parented, it's important to heal our own wounds and learn proper parenting techniques so that we don't perpetuate the cycle. As P.D. James wrote in Time to Be in Earnest, "What a child doesn't receive, he can seldom later give."

How, then, can we heal from improper parenting, thereby making ourselves whole, happier members of society as well as better parents to the next generation?

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How Well Are You Listening to Your Children?

When our children come to us with a problem, we usually want to help them. So we console, interpret, advise, distract or praise. Other times, we feel we must teach our children, and so we interrogate, lecture, moralize or order. And probably more often than we'd like, we respond angrily -- blaming, criticizing, ridiculing, shaming or withdrawing.

However, all of these responses are problematic -- whether with our children, or with the adults in our lives. They often serve to stop the communication of real feelings and the development of individual solutions. Take the quiz below, adapted from the classic Parent Effectiveness Training, by Dr. Thomas Gordon, to assess your listening skills.

1. I let my children feel their difficult feelings, knowing that comments such as, "Everyone goes through this" deny the strength of their feelings.

2. I try to listen for the need beneath the words and respond to that.

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Author's content used with permission, © Claire Communications

This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323