Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.
Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com

Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.
Licensed Professional Counselor
Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
Board Certified Professional Counselor
Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama, Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
Voice Dialogue Facilitator
Relapse Prevention Therapist
Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
Certified Life Coach
Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
Certified Associate of Logotherapy
Dialectical Behavior Therapy
Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com
December 2013
"There is a sacredness in tears. They are not the mark of weakness, but of power. They speak more eloquently than ten thousand tongues. They are the messengers of overwhelming grief, of deep contrition, and of unspeakable love."

- Washington Irving
Featured Article

The Impact of Unresolved Trauma on Relationships

Eleven seminars Physicians use the word "trauma" to describe an injury that results from a sudden impact. But we can suffer short- or long-term emotional traumas as well. When we lose a key relationship or something that means a lot to us, or when we experience betrayal, abuse or neglect, it injures our hearts. And like a wound to our physical bodies, emotional injuries also require care and attention so that we may heal.

Origins of Emotional Trauma
Our emotional injuries can occur in the present or in the past. In the present, we may face the end of a significant relationship, the death or departure of a loved one, the end of a certain stage in life, such as sending your kids to college, or some kind of abuse or attack.

In childhood we may have experienced an absent or distant parent, a teacher who insulted our intelligence, appearance or athleticism, or we may have experienced neglect or physical, sexual or emotional abuse.

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Finding an Antidote to the Poison of Shame

Every time Grace -- a gifted drama teacher -- taught a class, she returned home with an awful sinking feeling. She didn't understand why. "I had such fun and did a great job," she thought to herself. Yet, rather than expand from the delight and exuberance of her time in the classroom, she contracted.

Grace's contraction comes from the experience of shame, a poison that keeps us from experiencing our own joy and disconnects us from the aliveness within and around us. Whereas guilt is associated with a particular memory or event and having done something wrong, the feeling of shame is about being wrong at our core. It is a debilitating feeling we have about ourselves that comes from a core belief that we are basically and unalterably flawed.

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Author's content used with permission, © Claire Communications

This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323