Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.
Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com

Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.
Licensed Professional Counselor
Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
Board Certified Professional Counselor
Certified Sex Addiction Therapist (CSAT Candidate)
Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama, Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
Voice Dialogue Facilitator
Relapse Prevention Therapist
Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
Certified Life Coach
Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
Certified Associate of Logotherapy
Dialectical Behavior Therapy
Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com
March 2014
"When we step into the tranquil state of forgiveness, we feel genuine love for our whole self."

- Author Unknown
Featured Article

The Deepest Act of Forgiveness: Forgiving Yourself

Eleven seminars A friend forgives another friend for gossiping about her. A husband forgives a wife for lying to him about her intimate relationship with another man. A mother forgives the man who murdered her daughter. The human capacity to forgive even the deepest wrongs is awe-inspiring.

For many people, forgiving others is liberation from anger and grievance that leads to a richer and happier life. But there is an even deeper peace to be found through what might be the hardest act of all -- forgiving ourselves.

The first part of any conflict we must resolve is not between "me and my neighbor," but between "me and me." So believes author and therapist Thom Rutledge, who has written extensively on forgiveness and self-forgiveness.

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The Road to Forgiveness is a Journey Toward Freedom

"If unresolved anger is a toxin to the spirit, forgiveness is the antidote," wrote Brian Luke Seaward in his book, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water: Reflections on Stress and Human Spirituality.

When people get hurt, they often react with resentment, anger, rage, even hatred. While some of these feelings may be appropriate responses, holding on to them can cause emotional pain and stress. Nurturing old wounds and resentments is like tending weeds in a garden. The more care you give them, the more they take over until there's no room for the feelings that can nourish you.

Forgiveness doesn't mean condoning inappropriate behavior and excusing personal violations. It doesn't mean giving up or hiding or denying what was done. To forgive someone of something doesn't necessarily mean turning the other cheek so that you can be hurt again. To forgive doesn't mean you forget that you were harmed. Or that you felt the way you did as a result.

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Author's content used with permission, © Claire Communications

This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323