Human Connections Counseling Services Newsletter from Psychotherapist Mark Felber, M.S.
Mark Felber, M.S.
Human Connections
Counseling Services

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com

Mark Felber specializes in couples/marriage counseling and addictive behaviors. He also works with individuals who are experiencing grief, anger, and unresolved trauma issues. Other issues that often affect individuals such as drug abuse and codependency are also addressed in therapy.

Mr. Felber brings empathy and years of training in therapeutic techniques to his practice. His therapy sessions facilitate personal growth, heal childhood wounds, and address present difficulties.
Licensed Professional Counselor
Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor
Board Certified Professional Counselor
Certified Sex Addiction Therapist (CSAT Candidate)
Certified Multiple Addiction Therapist
Board Certified Practitioner of Psychodrama, Sociometry, and Group Psychotherapy
Voice Dialogue Facilitator
Relapse Prevention Therapist
Certified Solution-Focused Therapist
Certified Imago Relationship Therapist
Certified Life Coach
Level II Advanced EMDR Trauma Resolution Facilitator
Level II Advanced Grief Counseling Facilitator
Level II Certified Experiential Therapist
Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
Certified Associate of Logotherapy
Dialectical Behavior Therapy
Sensorimotor Therapy

Contact Mark today for a complimentary session to explore your issues.

214-796-2323
Email Mark

or visit his website:
www.marriagecpr.com





















July 2015
FREE LECTURE FOR GENERAL PUBLIC: ($30 for 3hrs CEUS)
Love & Sex Addiction:
From Downfall to Recovery for Sex Addicts and their Partners

Presented by Mark Felber LPC LCDC CSAT CP CET II

DATE: August 14, 2015

WHERE: Access Counseling, 2600 Ave K Suite 102
Plano, Texas 75074

TIME: 9:00am - 12:00pm

RSVP: Call Amanda or Casey, Office: 972-423-8727
Featured Article

Addictive Eating: Are You Powerless Over Food?

Eleven seminars The holidays of winter often bring to mind the image of a full table—and a full stomach. We gather with friends and family and feast merrily on pies and potatoes, turkey and ham and all of the fixings that many of us dearly enjoy.

There is another side to that pretty picture, however.

What if our extra consumption of calories during the winter is fueled not by good cheer and companionship, but by anxiety? And, further, what if it's not the gathering of loved ones that we most look forward to, but the food that we can't get out of our minds?

Also, while we may welcome gatherings with friends and family, they do bring with them extra stress and preparation. Add to the mix the anxiety caused by a sputtering economy, and many of us might find ourselves reaching for "comfort" food.

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Codependence: What's My Responsibility?

Do you find yourself consistently feeling unfulfilled in relationships, not asserting yourself enough, or perhaps you have difficulty figuring out where your responsibility for someone else ends? Issues like these and others, such as perfectionism, low self-esteem, distrust, and even physical illness related to stress can indicate that you have some codependent behavior.

Codependency commonly occurs when a loved one needs support because of an addiction or an illness and we take care of that person at the expense of ourselves. Codependents can also attempt to control everything within a relationship, again, without addressing their own needs, thus setting themselves up for unfulfilling interactions and even sometimes unintentionally discouraging the loved one from seeking outside help.

We learn codependency by watching and imitating people in our family and in society who display the behavior; thus, it is often passed down from generation to generation.

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Author's content used with permission, © Claire Communications

This ezine was sent to you by Mark Felber, Plano, TX. 214-796-2323