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March 25, 2014
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Hello,

Working with people all my life, I appreciate Albert Einstein's definition of Insanity: "Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results."

Are you frustrated that someone you care about does not understand you and your good intention? If "Help! Nobody is Listening!" is your frequent sentiment (whether you lament out loud or just to yourself), it is time to pause and reflect. Instead of trying to make your points repeatedly and hope that they understand, try something different. Try FIRST to listen to them.

I hope you find the feature article Listening Practices: Tips and Traps helpful. Please let me know what you think.

Love, Joy and Peace to You!
Winnis
Featured Article
Listening Practices: Tips and Traps

"My dear brothers and sisters, take note of this: Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry" (James 1:19).

Have you ever noticed how GOOD it feels to be really listened to? It's impactful, particularly when the listening goes beyond just the words you're speaking. That kind of artful listening conveys respect and value to the speaker and promotes positive relationships of all kinds.

And, like any art, it takes practice.

According to widely referenced statistics by Dr. Albert Mehrabian, known for his pioneering work in nonverbal communication, only 7% of communication happens through a person's actual words (38% through tone and 55% through body language). That's why it's important to hone our skills to listen at deeper levels.

A good place to start is by understanding the three listening levels described in the book "Co-Active Coaching," by Laura Whitworth, Karen and Henry Kimsey-House and Phillip Sandahl.

Listening Levels
Level 1 -- Internal: We hear the other person's words, but our focus is on what it means to us -- our thoughts, feelings, judgments and conclusions. We may also be concerned with what the other person thinks of us. This level is useful for checking in with our feelings or to make decisions.

Level 2 -- Laser-Focused: Our attention is focused like a laser beam on the other person, with little awareness of anything else. With such strong focus, we are curious, open and have little time to pay attention to our own feelings or worry about how we are being received. Mind chatter disappears with such a sharp focus.

Level 3 -- Global: Our attention is spread out like an antenna with a 360-degree range. It allows us to pick up emotions, energy, body language and the environment itself. Intuition heightens as we tune into the deeper layers of what is going on around us.

All three levels are necessary. However, when we spend too much time in self-focused Level 1 listening, our communication can seriously suffer. Engaging all three levels at once, with more emphasis on Levels 2 and 3, can improve how we listen -- and the impact of how we are received.

Listening Blocks
Having spent more than 20 years training business people in listening skills, Richard Anstruther and his team of communication experts at HighGain, Inc., have identified five main listening blocks:

• Tune Out -- Listeners are not paying attention to the speaker due to disinterest in the speaker or subject, thinking about other things or multitasking.

• Detach -- Listeners are emotionally detached from the speaker, concerned with content only, not the feelings behind it. They may be only half listening, not really interacting, and miss the message's underlying meaning.

• Rehearse -- Listeners are concentrating on what to say or do next, rather than focusing on the speaker's message.

• Judge -- Listeners have a different opinion that causes them to block out new ideas and information or lose track of the conversation. They analyze and interpret the speaker's delivery or message, missing the point. They criticize, give advice and make assumptions.

• Control -- Listeners don't allow the speaker to talk at his or her own pace. They constantly interrupt with comments or questions, and don't allow the speaker to finish a point.

Try This!
Below are a few suggestions for honing your listening skills. Enjoy them!

1. Experiment with Levels 1, 2 and 3 listening, one at a time, to fully understand the dynamics at each level. Try this in everyday conversation, or practice with someone. Take turns telling a story and listening. The results may surprise you!

2. Spend some time noticing how often you fall into tuning out, detaching, rehearsing, judging or controlling. What can you do to keep from falling into these common traps?

3. In your everyday conversations, or in an intentional practice session with a partner, explore each listening block, one at a time. Notice how you feel and the impact on the person with whom you are communicating.

The first step to developing artful listening is to choose to truly listen. As you continue to develop your listening skills, your communications and your relationships are likely to become increasingly satisfying and rich!

Author's content used with permission, © Claire Communications

Do you feel dismayed when someone you deeply care about keeps on complaining about you not listening? Learn to understand and accept where the other person is coming from, and you might have a big breakthrough in your interaction.

I'm offering one F.R.E.E. 50-minute confidential consultation at my Saratoga or Fremont office to ONE winner by drawing. To enter into the drawing, please e-mail winnis@parentingabc.com with the subject line "Enter PABC Drawing" by 11:59 p.m. on 3/30/14 (Sunday). Share this opportunity with someone you care about by forwarding this e-mail with your own special note.
about
Winnis Chiang Winnis Chiang is Founder and CEO of Parenting ABC, a company dedicated to teaching and coaching Chinese Christian parents from around the world how to make a difference in the lives of children, youth, and young adults. Her passion is fueled by the new life she received when she found Christ in 1989 after her marriage and parenting were no longer working. She specializes in helping Mandarin and Cantonese speaking parents to get along with, enjoy, and influence their American Born Chinese children.

Winnis is also a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in private practice in California. She holds a M.A. degree in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling from Western Seminary and a B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from U.C. Berkeley. Her former careers include being a software engineer, development department manager, stay-at-home mom, counselor of kids and teens at public schools, and children's minister.

Winnis and her husband (now a pastor) have been married since 1975 after only three months of dating. They enjoy their son, daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren!

Winnis Chiang, M.A., LMFT

www.ParentingABC.com

925-806-8600

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