Winnis Chiang Newsletter
  Personal Note From Winnis
  Feature Article - Raising Compassionate Kids
  Chinese Article - Receiving, Enjoying And Feeling Him
June 9, 2015
Manage your subscription with the link at the bottom of this e-mail.

To sign up for this ezine, click this link below.

SUBSCRIBE to this newsletter.
Hello,

How are you enjoying your summer? How are you spending time with your (grand-) kids, nephews, nieces, and students in your life?

Summer is here. It breaks the routines of many families. If you are a parent, or in charge of any young person, this is a good time to change the direction of where you are going. May the feature article Raising Compassionate Kids give you some new ideas as you review your goals of parenting and caring. Is there anything you wish you have done differently? It is never too late to start. Today is the tomorrow of yesterday!

Love, Joy, Peace and Hope to You!
Winnis
Featured Article
Raising Compassionate Kids

How to raise kids who are kind and considerate is a hot topic these days. With so much bullying happening in the world, both in schools and via the Internet, it seems more important than ever to raise kids who can be thoughtful and empathetic toward other people.

Children have an inborn capacity for compassion. Although you can take steps to raise a compassionate child who is kind to others yet strong enough to stand up to hurtful words and actions when necessary, the most important thing to remember is that children may listen to what we say, but they model themselves on how we behave. This means that if you practice and demonstrate compassion (with yourself, your child and the other people in your world), your child is very likely to emulate that behavior.

Here are some ideas to help you integrate compassion into your everyday life in ways that you can share with your child:

Volunteer. Show your child that all people deserve kindness by serving together at a soup kitchen or volunteering with Habitat for Humanity. Let your child choose a volunteer activity that builds on interests they already have (for instance, the Humane Society if they love animals or reading aloud to the blind if they love to read).

Get a pet or a small plot of dirt to cultivate. When a child is invested in the care of another living thing, they learn about nurturing themselves and others and are less likely to engage in bullying. And most pets and plants require time outdoors, so you'll both get a good dose of fresh air!

Practice listening. Darcia Narvaez, a writer for Psychology Today, says: "...if you are treated with empathy, you will treat others the same way." When your child is hurting, instead of responses like "keep your chin up" or "boys don't cry," invite your child to share his or her feelings. Particularly with younger children, hug them to provide soothing reassurance that it's okay to experience and express feelings of distress. When they feel loved and fully heard, it will be easier for them to listen to others with an open and compassionate heart.

Limit time with violent video games and television shows. Numerous studies have shown that media violence promotes aggression and desensitizes kids to the consequences of violent behavior.

Travel to a foreign country or a neighborhood very different from your own. Traveling to a place where people have a different culture, language and music shows a child that differences can be both interesting and fun!

Activities that promote compassion mean you'll be bonding with your child in ways you can both feel good about. In addition, activities like volunteering or growing a garden serve another purpose—they remind both of you that you have something valuable to offer the world. Your child's growing self-respect can help turn the tide of bullying and the devastating effect that this has on children's lives.

Are you frustrated with how some people hurt one another in today's world? This summer, start living out compassion moment by moment!

"Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you." (Ephesians 4:32)

Author's content used with permission, © Claire Communications

Real Life Story
Receiving, Enjoying And Feeling Him

When our son was 5-years-old, James and I had lots of conflicts about how to raise our little boy. We had different value systems and perspectives and ways to do things. As a result of all those arguments, I worried about our future as a family. It seems there was no way out!

Fast forward to the summer of 2003... two days after I had a major surgery. I was lying in my hospital bed, dealing with pains on my wounds, feeling weak and worrying about my recovery. I watched my dear son with half-opened eyes. I was so grateful that he was there with me that summer back from college.

As he read one devotional article after another, my heart gradually became calm and still. His strong baritone voice carrying comforting words of God filled my heart with warmth and sweetness. I thought, "My son has really grown up. He just finished the second year of college. It is really special that he came home to help us downsize... And now, he is taking turns with Dad to take care of me in the hospital. With a child like this, what else could I want?"

Suddenly, he grinned: "Hey Mom, here is another article quoting Psalm 46 verse 10."

He began to read, and I got very excited, "Do you know we could sing this verse?"

As he was still nodding, I cannot wait to start singing, "Be still and know that I am God."

Spontaneously he accompanied me at the second and third stanza. "Be still and know that I am God. Be still and know that I am God."

We sang the song over and over again in English. As we worshipped God in the hospital ward, we received the truth of God, enjoyed His presence, and experienced His great love.

Click here to read more
about
Winnis Chiang Winnis Chiang is Founder of Parenting ABC, an organization dedicated to training and coaching Chinese Christian parents from around the world to make a difference in the lives of children, youth, and young adults. Her passion is fueled by the new life she received when she found Christ in 1989 after her marriage and parenting were no longer working. She specializes in helping Mandarin and Cantonese speaking parents to get along with, enjoy, and influence their American Born Chinese children.

Winnis is also a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in private practice in California. She holds a M.A. degree in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling from Western Seminary and a B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from U.C. Berkeley. Her former careers include being a software engineer, development department manager, stay-at-home mom, counselor of kids and teens at public schools, and children's minister.

Winnis and her husband (now a pastor) have been married since 1975 after only three months of dating. They enjoy their son, daughter-in-law, and three grandchildren!

Winnis Chiang, M.A., LMFT

www.ParentingABC.com

925-806-8600

Share This Ezine
If you think someone may enjoy or benefit from this newsletter, feel free to forward this e-mail in its entirety, including our contact and copyright information.

© 2015 Winnis Chiang and Parenting ABC. All rights reserved.

This email was sent to you by: Parenting ABC

You are receiving this e-mail because you subscribed to [PABC] Newsletter at our seminars, workshops, retreats or teleclasses, or have opted-in on-line for this and other helpful gifts. Please "whitelist" this email so that you can continue to receive these valuable articles on parenting and relationship success. If you have changed your mind, go to the bottom of this e-mail to unsubscribe. If you receive this through a friend, sign up for your own complimentary copy at ParentingABC.com or SUBSCRIBE here.

Your name and e-mail address will never be sold or given to anyone. We value your privacy!